MamMaJ(ism)

It’s the AAVE for me!

February 08, 2021 MaJhane aka MamMaJ Episode 58
MamMaJ(ism)
It’s the AAVE for me!
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Hi, my babies! Welcome back to another episode of love and honest conversation 🥰 Today’s guided meditation, we are doing a coherent breathing activity✨Let’s work on regulating our breathing together 😌 Friendly reminder that coherent breathing helps to reduce stress and anxiety ☝🏾 This week, we are talking about AAVE and its importance to Black culture. I’ve noticed that certain groups of people have been given credit to certain words that exclusively come from Black culture, and that doesn’t sit right with me. Tune in to find out why!

Video on enslavement vs. slavery
https://www.choices.edu/video/enslaved-people-instead-of-slaves/

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MaJhané
Intro I  0:15
Hello, my babies welcome back to another episode its ya girl MaJhané aka MamMaJ my pronouns are she her and hers and you are listening to MamMaJ(ism). We are going to get started with our coherent breathing for this week. Get in a comfortable position if you’d like. Let me get my timer set up…and I clicked on the calculator. Alright. And I mean we’ve done this a few times so I’m not gonna give you a warning I’m just gonna, when I say kicking up we kicking up. Alright let’s begin. 

Inhale. Two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale, two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale, two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale, two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale, two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four, Inhale, two, three. Four exhale, two, three, four. Inhale, two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale. Two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale, two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. Inhale, two, three, four, exhale, two, three, four. 

2:29
Going up. 
Inhale two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four five. Inhale two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four, five. Inhale, two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four, five. Inhale, two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three four five, Inhale two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four, five. Inhale, two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four, five. Inhale two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four five. Inhale two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four, five. Inhale, two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three, four, five. Inhale, two, three, four, five, exhale, two, three four five.

4:09
kicking it up.
Inhale two, three, four, five six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six. Inhale, two, three, four, five six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six. Inhale, two three, four five, six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six. Inhale, two, three, four, five six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six. Inhale, two, three, four, five, six, exhale, two, three four, five, six. Inhale two, three, four, five six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six. Inhale, two, three, four, five six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six. Inhale, two three, four five, six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six. Inhale, two, three, four, five six, exhale, two, three, four, five, six.

6:00
Beautiful. We did it. That was awesome. We just did 5 full minutes of coherent breathing. Thank you thank you thank you so much for doing that exercise with me. I hope that we are all getting better at regulating our breath. It’s a beautiful thing to be in control of you’re breathing so that when you’re having a stressful situation just pull out that coherent breathing and you’re all set to go. Speaking of all set, lets go ahead and get into this episode.

[DP the Unknown - "Here/If"] 6:42

Hello, my babies, as I've mentioned, this is your girl MaJhane, AKA MamMaJ. My pronouns are she her and hers. And you are listening to MamMaJism. Thank you so much for deciding to listen in on this talk of love and honest conversation. So let's get into it. 
Happy black history month. Woo. Woo. I mean we're a week in. Yeah. Week two, but even still like, uh, it, it's just one of those things where it's like, Oh, we've been through so many black history month that you don't want to keep hearing about the same people in history, which yes. They have done amazing things. But, um, I think it's also important to talk about things that are happening currently and maybe some unsung heroes that people don't really talk about too much.
So yeah. Uh, we're going to get into that too, uh, throughout this month. But for this particular episode, I want to focus on this. So I feel like since it's black history month, it makes sense to have a conversation on something that has been bothering me for some time. Now, as you all know, Love tik tok.
Okay. You get a lot of information and inspiration for my daily life and it really has been a positive impact for me. Uh, but at the end of the day, it is a social media app. And sometimes I'm just not going to like what I see when I'm scrolling through my F Y P a and more specifically, I haven't been feeling the fact that gen Z gets credit for AAVE. What do I mean by that?
Give you an example. So a couple of nights ago I was scrolling away on my, for you page on Tik Tik. And I came across this video of a person that I'm following and. It was a stitch video. So the video was asking, tell me you're a millennial without telling me you're a millennial. And so this person stitched themselves in the video with their story to prove that they're a millennial.
And so she was saying, how so she's like a financial advisor or something I don't really remember, but I think that's the reason why I follow her. I don't know. But. She said that she had posted something on one of her social media accounts and people were responding in the comments with the blue hat emoji.
And she was super confused because she's like, why are all these people commenting this? What does this mean? What's going on? So she said, she asked her intern who is gen Z and asked them what it meant. And they explained it to her. What. What the emoji means. And for those of you who don't know, which I feel like my audience, you do, but in case you don't, when someone uses a blue hat, emoji, that's another word for a hat is a cap, right?
So when someone like gives the emoji of the cap, they're saying that you're lying, or if they say no, and then the emoji of the cap, that means not lying. Um, so yeah, essentially that's what that is. Um, and so. Let's get into why that I just, I didn't like that. Well, of course, when I had watched the video, I was like, What, like, what does she mean?
Uh, she had to go to a gen Z person to tell her what the emoji meant like, huh. So I made it a point to comment on the video and I was like, that's not gen Z. That is AAVE. And she was like, Oh, I had no idea. Thanks for telling me or sorry, whatever. And I was like, well, I mean, I guess I understand why you wouldn't know, because again, gen Z has taken over a lot of AAvE things.
Uh, so let's kind of get into that a little bit. So what is AAVE so it stands for African-American vernacular English. There are many words for this Ebonics slang, even blaccent. But, um, for me personally, I feel like I use the term black sin when it's someone who's not black, who's trying to sound like they are by using a blaccent or by like heavily using AAVE. It originated in the plantation of, um, the American South, where black people were enslaved. I want to pause for a moment and put a heavy emphasis on how my ancestors were enslaved. They weren't slaves, they were enslaved. So what it means to be enslaved, it means that you're captured and turned into a slave.
So when we make it a point to reduce that time period in American history, by simply saying that black people were slaves, but we're actually doing them a disservice. Um, and we're saying that that is who they've always been. Like, they were just slaves. You know what I mean? Really? In actuality, these were people who were captured from their homes.
They were brought to a place and forced into slavery. It seems like a slight difference. Um, semantics wise, and you kind of almost want to be like, Oh, tomato, tomato, like same difference, but that's not the case. Um, I will have a short video linked in my show notes where you can watch where they explain the difference between saying that someone is enslaved versus someone that is a slave.
If you want more information on that, but I ain't going hand hold you that's as much information I'm going to give you the rest. You have the internet. Okay. Um, but anyway, back to the topic at hand, going back to the word cabin for us, and this is just one example of many. I have seen so many videos on my for you page where people are giving gen Z the credit for things that are black culture, but that can be saved for another, another time.
Using capping we're just going to use capping as an example. Um, so that actually dates back to the eighties. Rappers were using it in songs to emphasize that they weren't lying and even to, to make fun of people. Uh, but the beauty about AAV is the fact that one word or phrase can transform its meaning throughout the years.
Really? It just depends. Capping for example, not only doesn't mean that you're lying or that you're making fun of someone. But it could also mean that you bust in a cap in somebody's ass, right? It really just all depends on the context of the conversation, but this is what, this is what we mean. When we say black culture is everything like this is black culture.
It's, it's just something that you know about because it's what you grew up hearing and learning about. It's the language that the people who look like you use to communicate. Like it's, it's a beautiful thing. And that's why it frustrates me so much when people try and give the credit to gen Z, what, like this shit's been around way longer than I don't even know where the gen Z cap cuts at, but these words, these phrases, like they've been around way longer.
The emoji hasn't the blue cap hasn't but like, it's not from gen Z. It is from black people, like respect the drip, Karen.
Sorry, I had to take a moment. Okay. So why is this important to know, uh, when you go around spreading misinformation like this, it creates an already huge divide between cultures. Now I'm not saying that this is millennials versus gen Z or even black culture versus gen Z. I actually really, really love. The gen Z is out there.
I feel like they are about they shit. They are very unapologetic in the things that they do and they say, and I have so much love and respect for them, but it's kind of one of those things where it's like intent versus impact. There are just some things that you should be able to pop, be like, pause, hold up.
This isn't coming from me as a gen Z, or this is actually coming from black culture. And I am someone who enjoys using it for whatever reason. Um, so that's what it is like, I guess, paying proper homage, homage. Do you say homage or homage? Do you say homage when you're, when you're, when you're in Italy. Okay. I don't know.
I'm just okay. But like, it's just one of those things and I don't know. I don't know what I'm saying anymore, but, uh, yeah, it's important for a slew of reasons, but mainly it's it's, it's, it's almost like, it's almost like. White people are using black culture and black things because they're cool and they can make fun of it and do whatever they want without the repercussions of what comes with those words and what comes with being black, like the black culture and stuff.
Like it's almost as if they get to enjoy being black without being black. That's great. Easy. Uh, I feel like I've heard that somewhere before, you know, like it's wild. So the challenge for this week is to check yourself. But plainly speaking, if you are someone who uses Ave and you're not black, maybe you should look into why, like try and figure out on an inner level, like what's going on or using these words because it sounds cool.
You heard it online and you want to sound cool. Like the cool kids are like, do you actually understand where, what it means, where it's coming from? Like, do you understand the words that you're saying? I have been. A perpetrator of this as well. There are words sometimes that I use that I don't know the, I don't know the background of it or the context or the history of certain words, but I use them because they seem on the internet or because I like how it sounds, but I might not be using them in the right way, or I might not be, you know, giving the credit to the people that, you know, it should be credited to.
Uh, so really just making sure that you're doing your part, if you, um, Don't don't continue the spread of misinformation. And you know, if you see somebody else making that mistake, correct them, obviously in a nice way, you don't have to be a poop head about it. Just like me. Like it was just a simple little.
Side know, not gen Z. That's all AVEE. Thank you. And she was like, Oh, I didn't know. Thank you so much for sharing. Like, yeah. sis I'm gonna let you go because I'm tired at it. Uh, but yeah, that's all I have for you today. Thank you so much for tuning in and I'll see you all next week.
Thank you for listening, please make sure to subscribe. If you haven't already and follow all the socials app mama monetarism. That's M a M M a J I S M. If you decide, you want to financially support me on my accounts, you'll be able to find out how thanks in advance until we meet again. Please be kind to one another.
And from the bottom of my heart, I love you.

Intro I
Coherent breathing exercise
Intro II
Happy Black History month!
Tik Tok and Gen Z
What is AAVE?
Enslavement vs. Slavery
Capping
why this is important
This weeks challenge
Outro